Innovating Pedagogy

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We have recently launched a new seminar series at Bath Spa University, called Innovating Pedagogy. The idea is that each seminar will critique a particular aspect of digital technologies and consider how they can be used to support learning, teaching and research. The sessions will consist of two parts; an overview presentation of the topic being considered and an interactive discussion to enable colleagues to think about the implications for their practice and for the institute as a whole. The first seminar in the series was on the latest report from the OU’s Innovating Pedagogy series, which explores new forms of teaching, learning and assessment to guide educators and policy makers. In particular the report describes ten innovations that are having an increasing impact on education. The 2015 edition lists the following innovations: 

  • Crossover learning focuses on learning in informal settings such as museums and after-school clubs. The report argues that formal learning can be enriched by experiences from everyday life and also that informal learning can be deepened by adding questions and knowledge from the classroom.
  • Learning through argumentation, where students can advance their understanding of Science and Mathematics by arguing in ways similar to professional Scientists and Mathematicians. Argumentation helps students attend to contrasting ideas, which can deepen their learning.
  • Incidental learning, which is unplanned or unintentional learning. Mobile devices, in particular, provide many opportunities for technology-supported incidental learning.
  • Context-based learning focuses on interpreting new information in the context of where and when it occurs and relating it to what we already know. In this way students come to understand its relevance and meaning.
  • Computation thinking is a powerful approach to thinking and problem solving. It involves breaking down large problems into smaller ones, recognising how these relate to the problems that have to be solved, setting aside unimportant details, identifying and developing the steps that will be needed to reach a solution, and refining these steps.
  • Learning by doing Science with remote labs, which engages students with authentic Scientific tools and practices such as controlling remote laboratory experiments of telescopes. This can help build Science inquiry skills, improve conceptual understanding and increase motivation.
  • Embodied learning involves self-awareness of the body interacting with a real or a simulated world to support the learning process.
  • Adaptive teaching uses data about a learner’s previous and current learning to create a personalised pathway through educational content.
  • Analytics of emotions through use of eye tracking and facial recognition tools, which can analyse who students learn.
  • Stealth assessment, which can measure hard to measure aspects of learning, such as perseverance, creativity and strategic thinking. It can also collect information about students’ learning states and processes without asking them to stop and take an examination. Stealth assessment techniques can provide teachers with continual data on how each learner is progressing.

The Innovating Pedagogy report series complements the annual New Media Consortium reports, which articulate the technologies that are likely to have most impact in education in one, three and five year timeframes. Both reports are useful as an indication of how education is changing as a result of new digital technologies. In the seminar we had a really interesting discussion on the implications of such practices for our own practices, as well as the implications for the institution as a whole.